Sunday, May 16, 2021

 REVISED COVID-19 PROTOCOLS FOR ST. STEPHEN’S.

 

May 16, 2021

7 Easter

Dear St. Stephen’s members and friends,

With the decision by the CDC on Thursday May 13 to cancel the mask mandate for full vaccinated people, we are all looking forwardly, cautiously, to the end of this very long saga of Covid in our lives.

            With that decision in mind, and in consultation with our Wardens and Vestry, I have revisited our own protocols at St. Stephen’s. These protocols are also in line with the soon-to-be-released protocols of the Diocese.  

            Please read the following revised protocols and keep them in mind as you consider coming to in-person worship at St. Stephen’s:

 

Gathering Masks will no longer be needed for fully vaccinated parishioners at this time. If you are not vaccinated or partially vaccinated, please continue to wear your mask at St. Stephen’s.

Singing: Congregational singing is now allowed without masks for fully vaccinated attendees.  

Passing the PeacePlease continue to use touch-free greetings.

 

Holy Communion We will continue our single station before the altar (no kneeling). We will continue to only provide the bread (no wine at this time). 

 

handouts: We will continue to use disposable booklets for all liturgies.

 

FoodCoffee Hour will remain suspended throughout the summer, though we are looking at ways to offer a few experimental coffee hours during the summer, including the June 20 celebration for Deacon John’s Diaconal Anniversary reception. We may plan additional coffee hours in July and August. It is our hope that we may  begin regular Coffee Hour on Dedication Sunday September 12.

 

ONLINE WORSHIP: Online worship through Livestream will continue, though we are encouraging people who are fully vaccinated to please start attending in-person worship if able.  

 

VaccinationsI cannot stress the importance of vaccines. If you have not been vaccinated, please get vaccinated very soon.

 

I am very grateful to share these revised and reduced protocols, and am looking forward to the day when we will no longer need protocols.

 

Please know I pray for each of you by name in the course of the week in my daily prayers. Please pray for me as well.

 

-peace,

Fr. Jamie Parsley+, Rector

 

 

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Anglican Rosary

 


Anglican Prayer Beads
A Form of Contemplative Prayer

Anglican Prayer Beads are a relatively new form of prayer, blending the Orthodox Jesus Prayer Rope and the Roman Catholic Rosary. The thirty-three bead design was created by the Rev. Lynn Bauman in the mid-1980s, through the prayerful exploration and discovery of a contemplative prayer group.

The use of the rosary or prayer beads helps to bring us into contemplative of meditative prayer—really thinking about and being mindful of praying, of being in the presence of God—by use of mind, body, and spirit. The touching of the fingers on each successive bead is an aid in keeping our mind from wandering, and the rhythm of the prayers leads us more readily into stillness.


Symbolism of the Beads
The configuration of the Anglican Prayer Beads relate contemplative prayer using the Rosary to many levels of traditional Christian symbolism. Contemplative prayer is enriched by these symbols whose purpose is always to focus and concentrate attention, allowing the one who prays to move more swiftly into the Presence of God.

The prayer beads are made up of twenty-eight beads divided into four groups of seven called weeks. In the Judeo-Christian tradition the number seven represents spiritual perfection and completion. Between each week is a single bead, called a cruciform bead as the four beads form a cross. The invitatory bead between the cross and the wheel of beads brings the total to thirty-three, the number of years in Jesus’ earthly life.

Praying with the beads
To begin, hold the Cross and say the prayer you have assigned to it, then move to the Invitatory Bead. Then enter the circle of the prayer with the first Cruciform Bead, moving to the right, go through the first set of seven beads to the next Cruciform bead, continuing around the circle, saying the prayers for each bead.

It is suggested that you pray around the circle of the beads three times (which signifies the Trinity) in an unhurried pace, allowing the repetition to become a sort of lullaby of love and praise that enables your mind to rest and your heart to become quiet and still.

Praying through the beads three times and adding the crucifix at the beginning or the end, brings the total to one hundred, which is the total of the Orthodox Rosary. A period of silence should follow the prayer, for a time of reflection and listening. Listening is an important part of all prayer.

Begin praying the Anglican Prayer Beads by selecting the prayers you wish to use for the cross and each bead. Practice them until it is clear which prayer goes with which bead, and as far as possible commit the prayers to memory.

Find a quiet spot and allow your body and mind to become restful and still. After a time of silence, begin praying the prayer beads at an unhurried, intentional pace. Complete the circle of the beads three times.

When you have completed the round of the prayer beads, you should end with a period of silence. This silence allows you to center your being in an extended period of silence. It also invites reflection and listening after you have invoked the Name and Presence of God.

Closing your Prayers
The following ending can be used with any of the prayers in this booklet. After three circuits around the prayer beads, you may finish as follows:

Last time through:

Invitatory Bead
The Lord’s Prayer

The Cross
I bless the Lord.

Or, in a group setting:
Let us bless the Lord
Thanks be to God.



Prayers

You may mix and match or put together your own.

 

Bless the Lord

The Cross 

Blessed be the one, holy, and living God.
Glory to God for ever and ever. Amen.

The Invitatory
O God make speed to save me (us),
O Lord make haste to help me (us),
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The Cruciforms
Behold now, bless the Lord, all you servants of the Lord. You that stand in the house of the Lord, lift up your hands in the holy place and bless the Lord.

The Weeks
I lift up my eyes to the hills;
From where is my help to come?
My help comes from the Lord,
The maker of heaven and earth.


Trisagion and Jesus Prayer

The Cross
In the Name of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

The Invitatory
O God make speed to save me (us),
O Lord make haste to help me (us),
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The Cruciforms
Holy God,
Holy and Mighty,
Holy Immortal One,
Have mercy upon me (us).

The Weeks
Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God,
Have mercy on me, a sinner.

Or, in a group setting:
Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Have mercy upon us.

*Trisagion means "thrice Holy"


Agnus Dei Prayer

The Cross
The Lord’s Prayer

The Invitatory
"Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my strength and my redeemer."—Psalm 19:14

The Cruciforms
Oh, Lamb of God that taketh away the sins of the world
have mercy upon us,
Oh, Lamb of God that taketh away the sins of the world
have mercy upon us,
Oh, Lamb of God that taketh away the sins of the world
give us Thy Peace.

The Weeks
Almighty and merciful Lord,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
bless us and keep us.
Amen.

*Agnus Dei means "Lamb of God"


Julian of Norwich Prayer

The Cross
In the Name of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

The Invitatory
O God make speed to save me (us),
O Lord make haste to help me (us),
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The Cruciforms
God of your goodness, give me yourself,
For you are enough to me.
And I can ask for nothing less that is to your glory.
And if I ask for anything less, I shall still be in want, for only in you have I all.

The Weeks
All shall be well, and all shall be well,
And all manner of things shall be well.

Or

In His love He has done His works, and in His love He has made all things beneficial to us.

This prayer was created by Sister Brigit-Carol, S.D.
www.solitariesofdekoven.org

 

A Celtic Prayer

The Cross
In the Name of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

The Invitatory
O God make speed to save me (us),
O Lord make haste to help me (us),
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

The Cruciforms
Be the eye of God dwelling with me,
The foot of Christ in guidance with me,
The shower of the Spirit pouring on me,
Richly and generously

The Weeks
Pray each phrase on a separate bead.

I bow before the Father who made me,
I bow before the Son who saved me,
I bow before the Spirit who guides me,
In love and adoration.
I praise the Name of the one on high.
I bow before thee Sacred Three,
The ever One, the Trinity.

This prayer was created by Sister Brigit-Carol, S.D.
www.solitariesofdekoven.org

Come Lord Jesus Prayer

The Cross
"Blessing and glory and wisdom and thanksgiving and honor and power and might be to our God forever and ever! Amen."—Revelation 7:12

The invitatory
"God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in time of trouble."—Psalm 46:1

The Cruciforms
"Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless God’s Holy Name."—Psalm 103:1

The Weeks
"Come Lord Jesus, draw us to yourself."—John 12:32

 

 

Saint Patrick's Breastplate

The Cross
I bind unto myself today the strong Name of the Trinity,
by invocation of the same, the Three in One, and One in Three.
Of whom all nature hath creation, eternal Father, Spirit, Word:
praise to the Lord of my salvation, salvation is of Christ the Lord.

The Invitatory
Christ be with me, Christ within me, Christ behind me, Christ before me,
Christ beside me, Christ to win me, Christ to comfort and restore me.
Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ in quiet, Christ in danger,
Christ in hearts of all that love me, Christ in mouth of friend and stranger.

The Cruciforms
I bind unto myself today
the strong Name of the Trinity,
by invocation of the same,
the Three in One, and One in Three.

The Weeks
1. I bind this day to me for ever, by power of faith, Christ’s Incarnation;
2. his baptism in Jordan river;
3. his death on cross for my salvation;
4. his bursting from the spic├Ęd tomb;
5. his riding up the heavenly way;
6. his coming at the day of doom:
7. I bind unto myself today.

1. I bind unto myself the power of the great love of cherubim;
2. the sweet "Well done" in judgment hour;
3. the service of the seraphim;
4. confessors’ faith, apostles’ word,
5. the patriarchs’ prayers, the prophets’ scrolls;
6. all good deeds done unto the Lord,
7. and purity of virgin souls.

1. I bind unto myself today the virtues of the starlit heaven,
2. the glorious sun’s life-giving ray,
3. the whiteness of the moon at even,
4. the flashing of the lightning free,
5. the whirling of the wind’s tempestuous shocks,
6. the stable earth, the deep salt sea,
7. around the old eternal rocks.

1. I bind unto myself today the power of God to hold and lead,
2. his eye to watch, his might to stay,
3. his ear to hearken, to my need;
4. the wisdom of my God to teach,
5. his hand to guide, his shield to ward;
6. the word of God to give me speech,
7. his heavenly host to be my guard.

Words: attributed to St. Patrick (372-466)
translated by Cecil Frances Alexander, 1889

Adapted for use with Anglican Prayer Beads by Laura Kelly Campbell


An Evening Prayer

The Cross
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

The Invitatory
Open my lips, O Lord,
and my mouth shall proclaim
Your praise.

The Cruciforms
Guide us waking, O Lord,
and guard us sleeping;
that awake we may watch
with Christ, and asleep
we may rest in peace.

The Weeks
Jesus, lamb of God, have mercy on us.
Jesus, bearer of our sins, have mercy on us.
Jesus, redeemer of the world, give us your peace.

Saturday, March 27, 2021

 REVISED COVID-19 PROTOCOLS FOR ST. STEPHEN’S.

 

March 28, 2021

Palm Sunday

Dear St. Stephen’s members and friends,

As we head into Holy Week, the Easter season and Spring, we are looking ahead hopefully as the numbers of new cases of Covid decrease and the numbers of people who have received the vaccine have increased.

Bishop Tom Ely and the Episcopal Diocese of North Dakota have just released their revised protocols for our Diocese. It is a relief, after all these many months, to be given a green light to cautiously and tentatively relax some of our protocols.

With that in mind, and in consultation with our Wardens John Baird and Jessica Anderson, I have also revisited our own protocols at St. Stephen’s and have point-by-point adapted the Diocesan protocols to our own particular needs.

Please be aware that these Protocols are subject to change. As we proceed, it my hope and prayer, that we will be able to relax more and more of them and that, sooner rather  than later, we will return to some sense of “normal” by Dedication Sunday on September 12. Again, that is my hope,  not a promise.

Above all, as we continue to gather for in-person worship, I cannot stress the fact that we must continue to be pro-active in how we gather. Under no circumstances will we relax our protocols regarding masks or  social distancing for the foreseeable future.  

 As I said in March of 2020, when we were just beginning the very long saga together,  my main commitment has been and continues to be the health and well-being of each of you. It has been my very real commitment that St. Stephen’s and anything we do here cannot under any circumstances be the reason one becomes ill. My main priority as your priest has always been your health and well-being, both spiritually and physically.

            With that in mind, please read the following protocols and keep them in mind as you consider coming to in-person worship at St. Stephen’s.

 

Gathering St. Stephen’s will continue prudent ways to decrease spread of disease. This includes the continued wearing of masks, distancing six feet, hand washing, avoiding others when sick, and ventilation such as open windows or meetings outside. We also have every other pew roped off. Please take full advantage of the hand sanitizer in the nave and elsewhere throughout the church. Also, please wash your hands thoroughly.

·         On-line worship – because of the great success of online worship at St. Stephen’s, all of our Masses and other liturgies will continue to be Livestreamed on Facebook, uploaded to our YouTube Page and included on our Webpage.

-Our Facebook Livestream:  https://facebook.com/groups/52039214842

-Our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcdWKCnCHmviajkFX5p-xGg

-Our webpage: https://ststephensfargo.org

·         In-person worship – Up to this point, we have not had any issues with too many people in attendance at our liturgies, though, over the last few weeks, as more and more parishioners have received the vaccine, our numbers have been steadily rising. We will continue to observe those numbers closely and act accordingly. All of our clergy, as well as our organist, have all been fully vaccinated.

·         Funerals and special gatheringsWe will continue to follow the same rules for these events as we do for in-person worship.

·         Children’s Chapel: Children’s Chapel will remain suspended until we feel safe enough to provide it again.

 

Singing: Congregational singing is now allowed. However, use of a mask, continued social distancing and proper ventilation remain in place.

 

Passing the PeaceTouch-free greetings with no hand shaking or hugs will continue.

 

Holy Communion We will continue our single station before the altar (no kneeling). We will continue to only provide the bread (no wine at this time). Masking and distance continue.

 

Surfaces and handouts: We will continue to use disposable booklets for all liturgies. The Prayer Books and Hymnals will not be used for the foreseeable future. The offering plates remain in a stationary position at the front of the nave. We will continue to ventilate the nave between liturgies.  

 

FoodCoffee Hour will remain suspended, though we are looking at ways to offer a few experimental coffee hours outdoors during the summer. It is our hope that, as the numbers decrease, we may tentatively begin Coffee Hour in some form beginning in September.

 

VaccinationsIf you have not been vaccinated, please make a plan to do so soon.

 

STAYING HOME: I will add one more item; if you are feeling sick, afraid of exposing family members and/or loved ones or are simply feeling uncomfortable attending church at this time, please feel free to stay home and join us through our online worship. If you would like to receive Holy Communion, please contact me, and either Deacon John or myself will come to your home and bring Holy Communion.

 

Revisit your plan frequently: We will revisit these protocols again in a few months and revise them appropriately.

 

Please know that my prayers are with all of you during this holiest of seasons, and that I look forward to that wonderful day when I can see all of you again in person. Please know I pray for each of you by name in the course of the week in my daily prayers. Please pray for me as well.

 

-peace,

Fr. Jamie Parsley+, Rector

 

 

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

The week of March 22 and looking ahead to HOLY WEEK

 

Wednesday, March 24 – Eve of the Feast of the Annunciation

6:00 p.m. – Holy Eucharist

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/ preacher

Deacon John, assisting

James Mackay, music

 

 

Friday, March 26

6:00 p.m. – Stations of the Cross

 

 

Sunday, March 28 – Palm Sunday

11:00 a.m. – Holy Eucharist

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/preacher

Deacon John, assisting

James Mackay, organist

Michelle Gelinske, cantor

 

 

HOLY WEEK 2021 at St. Stephen’s

 

Wednesday, March 31 – No Mass

 

 

Thursday, April 1 – Maundy Thursday

7:00 p.m. – Holy Eucharist (no foot washing this year)

Stripping of the Altar

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/ preacher

Deacon John, assisting

 

 

Friday, April 2 – Good Friday

Noon – Holy Eucharist from Reserve

Solemn Collects + Veneration of the Cross

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/ preacher

 

Saturday, April 3 – Holy Saturday

10:00 a.m. – Holy Eucharist

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/ preacher

Deacon John, assisting

 

Sunday, April 4 – Easter Sunday

11:00 a.m. – Holy Eucharist

Renewal of Baptismal Vows

Fr. Jamie, celebrant/preacher

Deacon John, assisting

James Mackay, organist

Michelle Gelinske, cantor

 

 

April 5-6

Fr. Jamie’s out of town

 

Our Sunday and Wednesday Eucharist services are open to public worship to limited capacity. We will be following strict protocols regarding worship. (See information below for details.) In addition, masses will continue to be livestreamed.   

 

Livestream:  https://facebook.com/groups/52039214842

Or on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcdWKCnCHmviajkFX5p-xGg

Or posted to our webpage: https://ststephensfargo.org

 

Mark your calendars:

April 2 - Stations of the Cross 3:00 p.m.

 


 

Public Worship Protocol:

St. Stephen’s resumed public worship on Sunday, January 10th. We ask that anyone planning to attend Mass, please follow the guidelines listed below. These guidelines are temporary, but they are essential as we move forward.  

There are several changes to how we worship that we will be following.

Here are the parameters for worship for the time being:  

 Every other row of pews is open. Please maintain 6 feet distance.

 All those attending Mass are expected to wear a face mask. Please bring your own mask. You will be expected to always wear your mask during the Mass.  

 There will be hand sanitizer available.

 Holy Communion will be served in one kind only (only the Host will be distributed; the Cup will not be offered to the congregation at this time). The Priest will use hand sanitizer before and after distribution. There will also be an effort made to not touch hands when distributing the Host.

 There will be no kneeling at the altar rail for Holy Communion. People are expected to stand in line maintaining a three-foot distance from those around them and receive the Host from the priest at a single station before the altar rail.  

 There will be no shaking of hands at the Exchange of the Peace. All are invited to use a noncontact way of greeting.  

 The entire liturgy will be printed in a disposable booklet. The copies of the Book of Common Prayer in the pews will not be used.  

 If you are sick, if you have any preexisting conditions that might be an issue, or if you have a fever or a cold, we ask that you not attend Mass.

 All our liturgies will continue to be livestreamed.  

 There will be no coffee hour at this time.  

Please be aware that all these policies are in line with both CDC and Diocesan standards for public worship.   If you are concerned by any of these policies or if you are in any way uncomfortable about attending public Mass at this time, please continue to join us through our livestreamed Mass.